Prosthodontics & Implants

Implants   |   Dentures   |   Bridges   |    Removable Prosthodontics |   Overdenture |   Implant Stabilization

Implants

 

Dental implants are artificial tooth replacements that were first developed half a century ago by a Swedish scientist named Per-Ingvar Branemark. Implants arose from the patient’s need to secure loose-fitting dentures. Since the advent of the implant, engineering and enhancements to the implant have enabled dentists to expand the implant’s usefulness, including the replacement of missing or lost teeth. Today, implant techniques provide a wide range of tooth replacement solutions including:

  • Single Tooth Replacement
  • Anterior Replacement
  • Posterior Replacement
  • Full Upper Replacement

Types of Implants

There are three main types of implants:

  • The root implant
  • The plate form implant
  • The subperiosteal implant

The root implant—by far, the most popular—is the most effective because it mirrors the size and shape of a patient’s natural tooth. This implant is often as strong as the patient’s original tooth. The implant or artificial root is placed into the jawbone under local anesthesia, then allowed to heal and integrate with the bone. Once the healing process is completed and the jawbone is attached to the implant, the patient returns to the dental office where the implant is fitted with the new tooth. This process generally takes anywhere from three to eight months.

The plate form implant is ideal in situations where the jawbone is not wide enough to properly support a root implant. The plate form implant is long and thin, unlike the root implant, and anchors into thin jawbones. It is inserted the same way as a root implant. In certain cases, the plate form implant is immediately fitted with the restoration without waiting for the healing process to run its course.

The subperiosteal implant is used when the jawbone has receded to the point where it can no longer support a permanent implant.

Post Implant Care

Although proper oral hygiene is always recommended for maintaining good dental health, it is especially important when a patient has received a dental implant. Bacteria can attack sensitive areas in the mouth when teeth and gums are not properly cleaned, thus causing gums to swell and jaw bones to gradually recede. Recession of the jawbone will weaken implants and eventually make it necessary for the implant to be removed. Patients are advised to visit their dentists at least twice a year to ensure the health of their teeth and implants. Dental implants can last for decades when given proper care.

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Dentures

Periodontal disease, injury and tooth decay can all cause a loss of your natural teeth. However, we can bring back the smile on your face with dentures to restore your missing teeth. With improved technology and updated materials, dentists can now make them appear more natural and more comfortable for the patient.

Types of Dentures

There are two types of dentures: complete and partial.

  • Complete dentures cover the patient’s entire jaw.
  • Partial dentures, with their metal framework, replace multiple missing teeth.

To know which type is best for you, be sure to ask your doctor.

It may take some time to adjust to your dentures. Speaking and eating may feel different at first, but these regular activities will resume normally once you are accustomed to your dentures.

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Bridges

If you are missing one or more teeth, you may find it difficult to chew or speak properly. Your dentist can remedy these and other problems by placing a bridge. A bridge is a dental device that fills a space previously occupied by a tooth, and may be required to prevent:

  • Shifting of the teeth, which can cause bite problems (occlusion) and/or jaw problems and resultant periodontal disease.
  • Bridges preserve the integrity of existing teeth and help maintain a healthy, vibrant smile.

Bridges can be manufactured from porcelain, gold, alloys or a mixture of these materials.

Three main types of bridges:

  • Fixed bridge- this is the most common type of bridge. It consists of a pontic (filler tooth), which is attached to two crowns that fit over the existing teeth and hold the bridge in place.
  • The “Maryland” bridge, also known as a resin-bonded bridge, is commonly used to replace missing front teeth and consists of a filler that is attached to metal bands that are bonded to the abutment teeth. The metal bands consist of a white-colored composite resin that matches existing tooth color. This is the least expensive type of bridge.
  • The Cantilever bridge is often used when there are teeth on only one side of the span. A typical three-unit cantilever bridge consists of two crowned teeth positioned next to each other on the same side of the missing tooth space. The filler tooth is then connected to the two crowned teeth, which extend into the missing tooth space or end.

Practicing good oral hygiene and seeing the dentist regularly ensures the longevity of your bridge.

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Removable Prosthodontics

Replacing your missing or damaged teeth will benefit not only your appearance but your overall health. Using state-of-the-art technology and updated materials, dentures can now be custom designed to look more natural and feel more comfortable.

It may take some time to adjust to your dentures. Speaking and eating may feel different at first, but these regular activities will resume normally once you are accustomed to your dentures.

Complete Dentures

Complete dentures are artificial, removable replacements for the natural teeth of the upper or lower jaw or both.

  • Upper dentures

    Upper dentures are held in place by a vacuum created between your appliance and the palate of your mouth.

  • Lower dentures

    Lower dentures are horseshoe-shaped to accommodate the tongue, and, due to lack of suction, are often held in place by implants placed in the jaw for support.

Partial Dentures

Partial dentures are removable appliances that replace missing teeth by attaching via a metal framework to your natural teeth.

Caring for your removable appliances:

Proper denture care is essential to the durability of your dentures and the overall health of your mouth.

  • Brush your dentures daily with a soft-bristled tooth brush. (Don’t forget to brush your gums and tongue as well.)
  • While not being worn, keep your dentures in denture solution and/or water (not hot) to prevent warping.
  • Handle with care and keep out of the reach of children and pets
  • If your dentures become loose, chip, break or crack, see your dentist.

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Overdenture

Advanced gum disease can cause teeth to become loose and painful. If several of your teeth are loose or painful, they may not be able to be saved. In this instance, we can remove some of the teeth and place an overdenture. This may be the best option for preventing infection and restoring your dental health.

Before regular dentures are placed, all teeth have to be removed, which causes the jawbone to recede. An overdenture is placed over some of your natural teeth; making the denture more stable and significantly preventing bone loss.

To prepare for your overdenture, your dentist will remove portions of the teeth that extend beyond the gum line. A root canal may also be performed to remove any infection. In addition, the teeth may be covered with small metal caps for more protection. Next, we’ll take impressions of your mouth to ensure the overdenture fits precisely.

Following placement you may have difficulty speaking, an increase in saliva flow, or other problems, which are only temporary.

Once you get adjusted to your new dentures, you’ll be eating and speaking with confidence.

 

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Implant Stabilization

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